28 SEPTEMBER 2017

Kirksey Represented at Post-Harvey Press Conference

Kirksey's Director of EcoServices, Julie Hendricks, spoke at a press conference with other Houston officials about green building strategies post-Harvey.

Julie Hendricks, Kirksey’s Director of EcoService and LEED Fellow, spoke on behalf of the AIA Houston Chapter Wednesday morning at a press conference on the Rice campus. A collaborative event hosted by Environment Texas and the Galveston Bay Foundation, the conference aimed to help explain why Houston must include green infrastructure in its post-Harvey recovery plans.

The press conference was held in the Harris Gully Natural Area on the university’s campus, the perfect location to illustrate Houston’s natural ecological landscape.

Julie-at-press-conference.jpg

Julie spoke about how our city’s original landscape had a brilliant way of addressing flooding, called a “water cycle” --- where a system of bayous, like veins in a leaf, wind through the landscape and out into Galveston Bay. Known as Low Impact Development (LID), architects and developers can use this natural design element in many of today’s building and development designs. Natural features such as raingardens and bioswales help slow down, infiltrate, store and clean rainwater runoff. They also support habitat and serve as beautiful amenities for the site, adding value for property managers and their users.

Other speakers at the event included:
Dr. Phil Bedient (SSPEED Center at Rice) – spoke about the benefits of green infrastructure and broadly defined to include regional detention features in addition to Low Impact Development.
Scott Jones (Galveston Bay Foundation) – discussed how runoff from the metro area is threatening the health of Galveston Bay.
Brian Zabcik (Environment Texas) – released a new report that ranks the state’s 5 largest cities on their LID and stormwater policies. The report can be found here.
 
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